Cormac Neeson says being a rock frontman affects mental health

Cormac Nesson has said he was left drained by life on tour. (Shona Cutt Photography/PA)
Cormac Nesson has said he was left drained by life on tour. (Shona Cutt Photography/PA)

The Answer frontman Cormac Neeson has said the rock lifestyle can have an impact on mental health which leaves its stars feeling empty and isolated.

Neeson has said that despite the pleasures of touring, the overflow of adulation and adrenaline can take its toll.

Fronting Northern Irish rock outfit The Answer, Neeson said that at times the good of the show came before his own well-being.

Belfast-based Neeson, 37, has said that being the focal point of a band’s performance carries with it expectations to exhibit the audience’s vision of rock and roll.

He has encouraged others within the music industry to share their feelings if they have been mentally drained in the same way.

Speaking to the Press Association, he said: “Whenever you’re fronting a band you have to present what you do with a particular shine to it, regardless of how you’re feeling.  You have to stay true to the song, even more than staying true to yourself sometimes.

“Maybe it’s a day off and the adrenaline supplies have been drained.  There’s a real empty feeling.  It’s not a nice feeling.”

“Even though you’re on a tour bus with your band, your best friends, your brothers.  And you’re kind of getting regular adulation.

“You’re getting told everyday how kind of brilliant you are, it’s still quite an isolating experience.

“You would trade it all in for an honest chat with one of your best friends.  Sometimes that’s not forthcoming on tour because it’s all about the gigs and the partying, and living that kind of good-time rock and roll lifestyle.”

Neeson, whose four-year-old son has Down’s Syndrome, has also spoken of the need of parents to seek support for their own domestic challenges.

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